Category Archives: Concert Reviews

Our impressions from shows that we get to witness in person.

Walk the Moon Impresses Orlando Fans

Walk the Moon Bassist Kevin Ray at HOB-Orlando
Walk the Moon Bassist Kevin Ray. Photo: Rarasfarm.com

Rock fans in Orlando had a chance to catch Walk the Moon, one of today’s hottest Alternative Rock artists, at the House of Blues in Orlando this weekend.  The quartet out of Cincinnati is touring the country riding the enormous popularity of their current hit single, “Anna Sun.”  The song has been kicking around the Indie music scene for a few years, but has recently exploded after being polished and re-released on their eponymous debut album on RCA Records.

The band’s sound is addictive pop rock with smooth harmonies and catchy lyrics.  On this night, they played a short set, as the opening act for Neon Trees (see that review here).  They were co-headliners on this tour, and by the time they hit the stage, the venue was packed to near sell-out capacity.  It was apparent from the opening notes of their set that a good majority of the engaged fans were there to see Walk the Moon.  The foursome who are known for painting their faces before performing found that there were a slew of fans who followed suit.

Lead vocalist and keyboard player, Nicholas Petricca is the focal point, but this is clearly a group where everyone contributes equally.  Drummer Sean Waugaman and bassist Kevin Ray were the steady driving back bone throughout the energetic rocking set.  The harmonies of Petricca, Ray, Waugaman and guitarist Eli Maiman were even better live than on the band’s debut release.  Petricca interacted with the crowd all night, often getting their hands in the air and leading some cool rhythmic clapping.  His unique voice sounded excellent live, and the remainder of the quartet’s music was tight and crisp throughout the show.

Walk the Moon Nicholas Petricca at HOB-Orlando
Nicholas Petricca of Walk the Moon. Photo: Rarasfarm.com

The highlight of the night was an extended version of  ‘I Can Lift a Car,” a fantastic song that superbly showcases the bands’ musical abilities and which clearly highlights the potential for these Ohioans to be much more than a one-hit wonder. The youthful crowd sang along throughout the show and were bouncing and swaying during the entire set.  For us more seasoned rockers, it was a nice treat to hear the band throw in an excellent cover of David Bowie’s “Let’s Dance,” with a nice Walk the Moon touch.

As expected, the band closed with a rousing performance of “Anna Sun” raising the crowd to a fever pitch, with the entire house singing and dancing along.  A great way to wrap up a passionate, albeit short set, from a band that proved they have what it takes to be a headliner their next time through Orlando.

Rock On!
Cretin

Ted Nugent Invades HOB

Ted Nugent
Ted Nugent in Concert at HOB-Orlando

With the Rolling Stones’ “Street Fighting Man” cranking over the PA. Ted Nugent and his band exploded onto the stage at HOB in Orlando Sunday night.  Festooned in his omnipresent camouflage cowboy hat, the legendary guitar hero tore up the stage on his Great White Buffalo Tour with a fantastic display of pristine guitar rock.

Nugent was his typical outspoken, entertaining self and absolutely on top of his guitar game from the opening notes of “Gonzo” throughout the entire 90 minute set.  We were also treated to the reunion of  Nugent and original vocalist/rhythm guitarist Derek St. Thomas, who has returned to the band after a long break. St. Thomas took the lead vocal on the second song’ “Just What the Doctor Ordered,” and sounded like he hadn’t missed a beat throughout the show.

Playing in front of a hug American flag and sporting a flag emblazoned Gibson for a few songs, Nugent is still a patriotic guy.  He doesn’t hide his patriotism, nor his conservative political fervor: “The whole world sucks, but here in America it sucks a little less.” He bashed Obama all night to the point of distraction, actually reminding me of the annoying anti-Bush rants of Springsteen a decade ago. It would have been nice to have had him back off the preaching and offer up an extra song or two.

Wild “Mick” Brown (Dokken) on drums and Greg Smith on bass kept the Motown beat going all night.  Smith took the vocals and showcased his bass playing on a nice version of “Need You Bad.” Brown, Smith and St. Thomas were the constant driving force, but this is truly all about Uncle Ted on guitar. Nugent traded off between a couple of his trusty Gibson guitars as he played in front of a wall of amps decorated with more than a dozen hanging guitars (as a well as a few machine guns). The guitar was loud all night, but those classic guitar riffs from “Wango Tango,” “Free For All” and some classic Blues and Rock flashbacks (“Cool Jerk”) were near perfect.

Nugent interacted with the crowd all night, and seemed to be having a great time, grooving to good old American Rock and Roll, with a Motor City Madmen’s Motown touch. He was his typical humorous, cocky self and just as over the top, as ever.  He was truthfully a bit of an ass, but just as soon as his pomposity started hitting new levels “…don’t you just love me..” his guitar magnificence brought us back around.

At 63, Nugent hasn’t lost anything as a showman. He knows how to please an audience, and was all over the stage playing solo after solo to the delight of the packed house. A raucous “Cat Scratch Fever” closed out the set and brought the crowd to a fever pitch, which carried on through to the ten  minutes of musical genius of the encore, “Stranglehold,” which is one of the most under-appreciated rock music masterpieces, and a timeless guitar song.

Overall, a fun night with a rabid crowd and one hell of a talented guitarist.  “Don’t you just love him…”

Rock On!
Cretin

Coldplay in Atlanta: Look at the (xylo)bands. Look how they shine for you.

About 7 months ago I begrudgingly purchased tickets to Coldplay – Christmas gifts for my 13 and 15 year old daughters. I liked Coldplay, but not enough to pay close attention to their music or to try to distinguish between their songs, which to me, all sounded similar. Not being the biggest fan of huge, mainstream productions in arenas, I cringed at the thought of going, and continued cringing all the way up until the point that I entered the venue.

Coldplay’s graffiti-inspired Mylo Xyloto set has got to be one of the most vivid backdrops I’ve ever seen – almost to the point of distraction. Adding to the spectacle, upon entering the arena fans were given “Xylobands,” light-up wristbands to wear during the concert. (A quick Google search revealed that the band spends nearly $600,000 per night on these bracelets for the tour.) The wristbands were programmed to light up at certain points throughout the show. I was skeptical at first, but have to admit, it really was pretty cool to see Atlanta’s Philips Arena, lit up with 20,000 lights. In fact, the Xylobands almost stole the show.

Coldplay Live in Atlanta
Coldplay Live in Atlanta at Phillip’s Arena

About half of the songs on the evening’s set list were from their most recent Mylo Xyloto album. And the other half pretty evenly spread from their older albums. The highlight of the evening was the encore set. Spotlights illuminated a small section of the lower balcony where two rows of about five seats were roped off. One by one, the band members joined Chris Martin in that very small area and performed an acoustic set of “Up Against the World” and “Speed of Sound.” (The only thing that could have made this any cooler was if the band members weren’t wearing matchy-matchy colorful outfits with parachute pants…but I digress.) The encore then continued from the main stage with “Clocks” “Fix You” and “MMIX”. Chris Martin led into “Fix You” with Ray Charles’ “Georgia on My Mind.” The crowd went wild.

The music was much better than expected, and the scenery was spectacular. So over-the top in fact, that every now and then I found myself feeling like I was watching some sort of elaborate Disney concert, or perhaps Coldplay had stolen the Wiggles’ uniforms, but those thoughts were fleeting and overpowered by the fact that, all in all, it was a really good show.

DeeCeeZee

Editor: Click here for a recent review of Wolf Gang the opening band on this tour.

Wolf Gang Tears Up Orlando at The Social

I’ve seen a slew of concerts over the first half of the year, but none of them stood up to the dynamic show that London’s Wolf Gang delivered at The Social this weekend. This talented and energetic quintet is a band that we’re going to be hearing a lot from in the years to come, and they blew away the Orlando crowd with a blazing sixty minute set.

While most of Orlando was at The Amway Center abusing their ears with thousands of screaming pre-teens at the One Direction show, a sage group of discerning Rock And Roll Animals saw some truly majestic rock ‘n roll in the cozy club on Orange Avenue. If you were one of the many who chose the wrong venue on this evening, you really missed something special.

Max McElligott is the musical vision behind these young alt-rockers, having penned and performed all of the songs on the band’s excellent debut album Suego Faults. He’s also assembled a fantastic line-up of passionate musicians who have been touring extensively for about a year. Their set was predictable, with all but nine cuts off of the album, plus three other new songs. Suego Faults is really quite good, certainly one of the top ten of the year thus far. Surprisingly, the live performance actually exceeded those lofty standards.

They opened the set with a new track, “Into the Fire,” one that featured McElligott on guitar that got the house rocking from the start.  He switched over to keyboards for the next song, “Something Unusual” where we had our first taste of the band’s amazing harmonies. He traded off between guitar and keyboards throughout the show and on quite a few songs, he left the playing to the remainder of the band and took center stage with just the mic.

McElligot voice is powerful and distinctive and his range broad. The uber-talented front man sounded near perfect and the backing harmonies from his band mates were spot on, matching the excellent vocals from the album. On stage, McElligott reeks of charisma and certainly offers a theatrical touch. At times I thought of Freddie, other times Bowie, most times…I thought I was seeing the next legend out of England.

Interacting with the crowd throughout, McElligott was comfortable on stage, from his opening “Welcome to the wonderful people of the Social Bar” to sharing the London lads’ rough initial taste of our searing Florida sun. I was impressed by the energy of the band at the relatively small Social, immediately after wrapping up a huge arena tour with Coldplay, yet they seemed to thrive in the more intimate club.

The band members were tight and cohesive throughout the evening, and they all switched off between instruments, as well. James Woods on bass was a non-stop whirling dervish and powered the band through a rollicking version of Stay & Defend. Lasse Petersen on drums was the band’s backbone all night, and absolutely shined on another new cut, “The Kill.”

We had a chance to witness the group’s softer side on both “Promises” and the spectacular “Suego Faults” which featured three keyboards, highlighted by McElligott and Jamie Jones, and some of the best vocals/harmonies of the night. McElligott had the crowd in the palms of his hands, expertly adjusting the flow and timbre of the show throughout.

The entire band seemed energized during “Dancing With the Devil” which featured a nice solo from Gavin Slater, before slowing things down with a nice love song, “Midnight Dancers.” From there, the band wrapped up the show with their two biggest singles to date, “The King and All His Men” and “Lions in Cages” closing out a great set, raising the energy level to a fever pitch and sending the crowd home convinced they had seen something special.

Random Ramblings:

  • Charlotte’s Flagship offered a nice opening set in their first trip to Orlando, highlighted by their drummer, Mike Finster, who tore it up the entire set, despite playing on a borrowed drum kit! They’ve got a unique sound and are definitely worth a trip to check out next time they are in town.
  • Wolf Gang’s drummer, Lasse Petersen is apparently an excellent cook, with a fondness for duck, and actually cooked at Hard Rock Hotel this week.
  • All five members of Wolf Gang hung around after the show and got to know their fans; they really seemed to care about meeting everyone, asking names, chatting, and listening! It was refreshing to see.
  • Wolf Gang is looking to come back to Orlando this fall, so keep your eyes peeled to RARA’s Farm for the show announcement, and next time, don’t let some teeny-bopper boy band deter you from their excellent show.

If you were there, let us know what you thought in the comments below. If you were trapped into seeing One Direction to please your eight year-old niece and want to rehabilitate your ears, check out the album below.

Rock On! – Cretin

See the setlist below

Wolf Gang with RARA's Farm's Kerri
Wolf Gang with RARA's Farm's Kerri in Orlando

Setlist

Into the Fire
Something Unusual
Stay & Defend
The Kill
Where are You Now?
Promises
Suego Faults
Back to Back
Dancing with the Devil
Midnight Dancers
The King and All His Men
Lions in Cages

 

Kickin off Summer with The Rocket Summer

 

Bryce Avary of The Rocket Summer on the Keyboard

 

This Wednesday night was the first night of summer in Orlando.  For a few hundred happy fans it was a fantastic Rocket Summer.  Putting on a passionate and energetic performance, Bryce Avary, the soul of The Rocket Summer lit up the stage at The Social in Orlando for nearly two hours. He is currently on tour promoting the band’s fifth album Life Will Write the Words. Avary started performing in Orlando about 8 years back and has made the city a repeat destination on his tours, and for good reason; his fans love him!

The Rocket Summer opened the night with an extremely impressive showcase of Avary’s musical talents – the energetic, multi-talented musician displayed his ability to play the drums, then moved to the keyboard, slid over to the bass guitar and finally rocked on lead guitar. With guitar in hand he fired up the crowd as he kicked into “Do You Feel”

Quickly realizing the show was only going to get more intense and energetic he performed “Hills and Valleys” and then the band played the first song off of the new album – “Run and Don’t Stop.” The new album hit the shelves just two weeks ago, yet there was hardly a person in the venue not singing along.  For “Of Men and Angels” – a definite crowd-pleaser – he took things down a notch and moved over to the keyboard to express his piano abilities.

The Rocket Summer then picked things back up with one of their most popular songs “Break it Out” allowing the fans to sing along while showcasing his musical skills. “Prove It,” another hit off the new album got the crowd jumping, then just as they reached a frenzy, Avary disappeared from the stage leaving the crowd searching.

Suddenly, fans at the back of the venue started screaming as Avary, guitar in hand walks to the center of the floor – takes a seat – and performs yet another song off the new album, “Soldiers.” A much more personal performance sang right in the heart of the fans.  After his performance he stood up on the bar and dove into the crowd as they passed him along back to the stage.

Before the performance of “Walls,” Avary spoke to the crowd about how much this song meant to him and that he wanted everyone to know they weren’t alone – it was a goose-bump moment to say the least, as the crowd sang in unison and his very impressive piano performance was displayed. The performance of “Revival” was the most rocking performance of the night; we heard more edgy vocals and saw more head banging, guitar rocking, and crowd jumping in this song than any other of the night. The Rocket Summer closed the set with “You Tell Me To Live.”

Bryce Avary in the crowd
Bryce Avary of The Rocket Summer in the crowd

With the crowd rhythmically chanting and clapping for more, Avary returned to the stage, this time without the band. He opened the encore with three solo acoustic songs – all highlighting his outstanding vocal talent. I found it very unique that Avary opened the floor to the crowd on which songs they wanted to hear next and gave a few lucky fans the satisfaction of having their request selected.

Avary then decided it was time to throw “a little dance party” and once again ran around stage playing every instrument he could get his hands on, while the crowd danced mesmerized by his diverse musical ability.

In total, The Rocket Summer put on an encore of seven songs plus a little dance party. Avary repeatedly noted to the crowd that he just wanted to keep playing. A highlight from the encore was the performance of “Circa ’46” – this was the first time ever performing the song live. Avary noted to the crowd they had practiced it a few days earlier and wanted to test it. Throughout the performance he yelled “well this isn’t going so bad.” Truly a fun experience to be part of.  They closed the night with” I Need a Break… but I’d Rather Have a Breakthrough.”

Not only are the vocals of Avary perfectly on key but his musical talent is absolutely amazing. How many artists do you know who can perform for close to two hours, sing in the midst of a frenzied crowd, stage dive, crowd surf, interact with the fans, and move between playing the keyboard to the guitar singing the entire time, then put on a 7 song encore?

Bryce Avary is one of those musicians that is grateful for the fans that continue to come out and support his dream year after year and he rewards them with a jaw dropping performance. He connected with the entire crowd throughout the show and made sure everyone knew how thankful he was, and by the length of his encore really showed he had no desire to leave the stage.

I also noted that The Rocket Summer played seven songs off their new album, whereas most bands only play a few new cuts off a brand new album and stick to the fan favorites. Avary took a risk and it paid off as the crowd knew all the words and not a person seemed disappointed; but after a show like that how could you be?

– Kerri –

Check out the setlist below.

Setlist

Do you Feel
Hills and valleys
Run and Don’t Stop
Of Men and Angels
Break it Out
Prove it
Soldiers (played in the middle of the crowd)
Brat Pack
200,000
Walls
Revival
So, In This Hour
You Tell Me To Live

Encore:

Around the clock
Save
Never Knew
“Dance Session”
So Much Love
Circa ‘46 (first performance ever)
Just for a Moment Forget Who You Are
I Need a Break… But I’d Rather Have a Breakthrough

Roger Waters Dazzles Orlando with The Wall

“Rock concert” isn’t the right description.  Rock show? Rock extravaganza? Rock experience? Rock spectacle? Rock theater? They’re are all more accurate descriptions of what we were able to witness from Roger Waters’ The Wall Live, Saturday night at The Amway Center.

Waters brought his show to Orlando with a two hour production that actually brought The Wall extravaganza to an even greater level.  1979’s masterpiece, The Wall was Water’s seminal moment, and he’s taken the thirty years of technology and politics that have unfolded since to ratchet up the experience for fans everywhere.

It’s hard to imagine, but the spectacle that Orlando witnesses was actually toned down from the one he performs at outdoor venues! Still, what we saw on display was a near perfect rock ‘n roll experience. The show takes one of the greatest albums ever, updates the vision and ties in three years of animation effort to deliver a fantastic sensory experience.

roger waters the wall live
Roger Waters The Wall Live in Orlando (B. Hoenig)

The show started with a wall partially built about half way around the stage.  As the band kicked into “In The Flesh?,” Waters performed from in front of the wall structure with the remainder of the band visible through the openings in the wall.  The 68 year-old Waters sounded fantastic from the start. We also witnessed the only significant pyrotechnics of the show. They were impressive and perfectly timed, culminating with a model plane screaming across the crowd and exploding into the wall.

From there, Waters and the band went through the first two sides of the album.  There was minimal straying from the script, but in those brief moments, Waters seemed to be more affable than his former prickly self, and truly appeared to be basking in the warmth of the appreciative crowd.

During “Another Brick in the Wall,” we had a few nice treats.  A local group of singers took the stage to sing the children’s chorus and theatrically battled a huge inflatable demented teacher.  We also had our first real taste for David Gilmour’s replacement, as  Dave Kilminster nailed the guitar solo. Over the course of the night, we saw three different guitarists filling Gilmour’s void and Robbie Wyckoff ably taking his vocal leads.  Not the exact same perfection we could have expected from Gilmour, but truthfully, they were pretty damn good.

Throughout the show, the wall was just as much a focal point as the performers.  It was a technological masterpiece, where each block became interactive the moment it was installed. We saw some wild effects: a surging red sea, a battalion of WWII aircraft, freakish animated characters, worms, various effects to the wall itself and so much more. Some mind-blowing stuff, and every bit of it perfectly choreographed. The Amway Center really shined, as well. The surround sound effects and sound in general were excellent, and the ability to handle all of the effects so smoothly was impressive.

Two of the earlier highlights were a stark version of “Mother” where Waters sang a duet with a video of himself from the 1980 version of the song recorded live in London, and “Goodbye Cruel World” which he sang through the only remaining hole in the wall.  After closing the song, the final block was placed, completing the wall, which then stretched three stories high and the entire width of the arena.

The political messages and imagery throughout the show were prevalent and most centered on Water’s anti-war sentiment, driven by the deaths of his father and grandfather in World Wars II and I, and mistrust of government in general.

After intermission, “Hey You” was played entirely with the band hidden behind the wall.  It sounded great, but was admittedly odd never seeing the performers.  Shortly afterwards, a large segment of the wall folded forward revealing Waters in a living room setting staring at the TV. It was a wonderful theatrical touch to “Nobody Home,” and again Waters’ voice was perfect.

The remainder of the band basically played the entire side 3 of the album behind the wall, until the crowd favorite “Comfortably Numb,” which began with Waters alone in front of the wall.  At the beginning of the “David Gilmour” vocals, a spotlight found Wyckoff atop the wall. The vocals were perfect, and just as Gilmour’s signature guitar solo started, we spotted Kilminster high atop the opposite side of the wall and he absolutely nailed it, receiving the largest ovation of the night.

Roger Waters performing The Wall Live
Roger Waters performing The Wall Live in Orlando

For the last segment of the show, a drum kit rose from beneath the stage and the band performed from in front of the wall.  “In the Flesh” was another theatrical highlight, and Waters dedicated a brilliant version of “Run Like Hell” to all of the paranoids in the crowd.  The latter cut was the highlight of the show for me with absolutely stellar vocals from Waters.

Ten minutes later, the wall was a pile of rubble as the full band came out for a whimsical close with a nice unplugged version of “Outside the Wall.”  They soaked in the two minute standing ovation from the crowd before Waters introduced the fantastic players in the band, thanked the crowd and exited stage left.

A wonderful close to rock theater perfection.

Rock On! Cretin

If you were at The Wall Live, let us know what you thought of the show below.

Jackie Bristow Enchants Orlando

Just a woman and her guitar, but, oh my… what a nice sound…

Jackie Bristow live in Orlando
Jackie Bristow live in Orlando. Photo: Hallie Ballie

Jackie Bristow brought her beautiful voice back to Orlando, opening for John Waite at Plaza Live. The New Zealand born muse now hails from Austin, Texas, and she’s developed a distinctive, melodic voice that I would best describe as Kiwi Country.

The stories in the music were the clear highlight of the show. She offered soulful selections off of her 2007 release Crazy Love and several more from her 2010 offering Freedom. The highlight of her forty-five minute set was the title track off of “Crazy Love” an introspective look at a woman who can’t seem to shake the memory of a former love. “‘Cause there’s something about the way you look at me, I forgive your everything, Oh love, such a crazy love…” It’s a beautiful, tender song perfectly matched to Bristow and her pure style.

The sound in The Plaza Theater is pristine and was the perfect setting for Bristow who played her entire set solo, accompanied only by her trusty acoustic guitar. Her songs are stories from her life, and she did a great job bonding with the crowd all night.  In one humorous exchange she shared that she was a Southern Girl, born in Southern New Zealand, then moving to Austin (she also reminded the crowd that Southern New Zealand is a bit more frigid than the Southern U.S.)

On this night, she was the ideal opening act for John Waite and his band (see that review here). Surprisingly, she plays fairly often in Florida, so make sure you keep your eyes peeled for the next time she’s in town.  Good stuff!

Cretin
(see the full set list below)

Here’s Jackie performing Crazy Love from her show in Orlando last year: Crazy Love: Live

Setlist

Tempted
Running
Come Down
Freedom
Crazy Love
Rolling Stone
Innocence
Holy Mess
Crying

John Waite Tumbles through Orlando

Shaun Hague and John Waite
Shaun Hague and John Waite. Photo: Hallie Ballie

Almost a year to the day, John Waite returned to Orlando for another strong show at The Plaza Live in Orlando.  He’s supporting his Rough and Tumble Tour with a strong band and this night, he was at his interactive best. It was clear early on that this was going to be a special night. The cozy crowd of a few hundred folks seemed to instantly put Waite into a story-telling mode and he shared quick snippets, chatting and joking with the crowd all night, seemingly having a blast throughout the sixteen song set. The sound at the cozy Plaza Live venue is just great, and was spot on for this show.

The setlist featured songs from all stages of Waite’s career as well as a few nice surprises. He kicked off the set with two rocking cuts off of the new album, “Rough and Tumble,” the title track and “Better Off Gone,” which featured a fantastic guitar solo from the uber-talented Shaun Hague. From there, Waite deftly navigated through his catalog as well as a few classics from past bands Bad English and The Baby’s.

It’s been 30 plus years since the heyday of The Baby’s, yet Waite’s under-rated voice is as good as ever, and he’s always pushing himself in new directions. For fans of that era, we got to hear “Back On My Feet Again,” featuring some phenomenal bass work from Philadelphia native and Dee Dee Ramone lookalike Tim Hogan. “Head First,” “Every Time I Think of You” and a stripped down version of “Isn’t It Time” were also on the set list. They were all decent and certainly crowd favorites, but on this night, the new stuff really shined.

“If You Ever Get Lonely” is a great love song just screaming for radio play and one of a handful on the new album co-written with Kyle Cook of Matchbox Twenty.  “Sweet Rhode Island Red” is a groovy Tina turner cover that conjures up nice memories of The Baby’s. We also had a chance to listen to two other covers, a smoking version of Dylan’s “All Along the Watchtower,” where Hogan, Hague and drummer Rhondo dominated the stage and then a cool version of Vince Gill’s “Whenever You Come Around.”

When Waite introduced the fantastic “Bluebird Cafe” he shared a poignant moment with the crowd, noting that after composing that track, it was the first time he actually considered himself to be a story-teller.

He finished the night up with four huge crowd favorites. A nice Rhondo drum solo melded into Waite’s biggest hit “Missing You,” followed with his biggest Baby’s hit “Head First” which had the crowd on its feet and singing along.

The crowd pulled Waite back out for an encore and a solo version of Bad English’s “When I See You Smile.” It was a great singalong version that again had everyone on their feet and in fine voice.  His band mates then joined him for a powerful closing version of “Every Time I Think of You,” a great end to a great show.

I have to add that Waite did something almost unheard of these days after the show.  He and Hogan stayed around on stage mixing with the fans, until they had signed articles for everybody waiting; a wonderful touch of class!

Rock On – Cretin!

(Please check out the full setlist below)

Setlist

Rough and Tumble
Better Off Gone
Back on My Feet Again
If You Ever Get Lonely
All Along the Watchtower (Bob Dylan cover)
Whenever  You Come Around (Vince Gill cover)
Bluebird Cafe
Isn’t It Time
Mr. Wonderful
Downtown
Imaginary Girl
Sweet Rhode Island Red
Drum Solo
Missing You
Head First

Encore
When I see You Smile
Every Time I Think of You