Category Archives: Album Reviews

Man On Earth Album Review

Man On Earth Album Review

I literally get dozens of albums a week in my InBox and it is basically impossible to listen to everything that comes through the mailbox, but this offering from Man On Earth, a band totally unfamiliar to me, caught my attention.

First, the email came from a band member, bassist Adam Root, and that always makes a positive impression to me, as I have a great deal of respect for hard-working passionate bands.  Their bio mentioned linkages to three bands I have a great deal of appreciation for: Theory Of A Deadman, Fun., and Lenny Kravitz, and they have a relationship with a professional hockey team (sure it’s just the Islanders, but still…).  Interest piqued, I downloaded the album and took it for a spin, and I was not disappointed.

The eponymously titled album is a fun offering that boasts big, powerful rock songs; music that should translate excellently on stage. At times gritty garage rock, pop punk and mainstream rock, it’s a nice mix of songs that will appeal to most active rock fans. We immediately get good insight into what the albums has in store for us with the hard-driving drums and aggressive bass line that kick-off the subtly titled first track, “Bang Bang Bitch.”

Throughout the album, the New York City band’s talent and diversity is frequently on display. “If Not Then, When” boasts searing guitars, and “On Our Own” is bouncy pop punk that rekindles fun memories of Sum 41. “We Are The Dreamers” is borderline sappy, but Steven Nathan’s vocals and lyrics are worthy of attention, and the tender Knopfler-esque guitar damn near beautiful.

My favorite track is the radio hit-in-waiting, “Lost In These Lights.” It’s a little slicker and poppier than most of the tracks. It’s a clean, well-produced, catchy tune that would feel perfect blasting through any car stereo.

As noted, there are a handful of highlights, but the record is at times a little uneven, and there are a few tracks that will get minimal play on my iPod, but overall, it’s an album worth owning from a band that should be on the radar of rock fans throughout the country.

Rock On!

Check out the album on iTunes:

Mother Mother – Eureka

Eureka! Yup, I’m a little late, but I finally got my hands on Eureka, the third album from Mother Mother, a talented and under-appreciated quintet from Vancouver, British Columbia. Definitely worth the wait for this diverse collection of alt-country-dance-funkadelic-harmonic rock. It’s impossible to classify their sound as anything but original; they sound like Mother Mother, period.  And, that’s just fine for open-minded rock and roll animals like myself.

The album is pretty damn entertaining and definitely worth a few listems. I strongly recommend giving it a few spins (and “yes” it is available on vinyl), as these ditties grow on you.

Eureka is produced by Ryan Guldemold, the band’s principal writer, lead guitarist and male vocalist. Mother Mother also features the vocals of Ryan’s sister Molly and Jasmin Parkin and their three part harmonies are found throughout. Those smooth harmonies coupled with their quirky distinctive music deliver a handful of unique infectious tunes.

The first four tracks are all excellent. “Chasing It Down” kicks off the album. The song is a roller coaster ride of mixed tempos, and features a hook from Ryan’s distinctive falsetto that will bounce in your head for days.  The harmonies from the ladies and 70’s influenced organ riffs are unique and entertaining.  It is followed by “The Stand” the first single released by the band, which features a humorous Boy vs. Girl call-and-answer vocal performance from all three singers. The song is not great, but the lyrics are, as evidenced by Ryan explaining his vices; “There’s women on bikes or just women who straddle.”

“Baby Don’t Dance” is my favorite track off of the album. I reflexively cranked up the volume to this tune, and it became an instant favorite and is just a total blast to listen to. Fantastic vocals, great keys, cool bass and guitar. Simply described, it’s just a great party song, possibly one of my Top 10 for the year. You may find yourself reminiscing about classic B-52 dance tunes. “Original Sin” gets off to a mediocre musical start, but the vocals as usual are superb, with all three vocalists playing key roles.  It’s another one that you’ll find yourself singing along with.

Those first four tunes are all very strong.  Afterwards, some of the songs seem a bit over-produced, but do a good job highlighting the band’s intricate harmonies and clear musical talent, including bassist Jeremy Page and Ali Siadat on drums.

“Simply Simple” is a beautiful song with amazing lyrics from Ryan, clearly showcasing the high end of his great range.  Again the harmonies are dead on.  They remind me of the beautiful harmonies from the 90’s talented yet under-the-radar Voice of the Beehive. “Simply Simple” is immediately followed by “Problems,” which again accentuates the band’s incredible diversity.  This ditty hearkens back to the more rockabilly sound from their earlier recordings.  The guitar is great, Jeremy Page’s bass is superbly hypnotic, and it’s just a blast to listen to. “Oleander” is a big song that again features great vocals, and nice keys.

The remainder of the songs are enjoyable, if not unremarkable.  I feel as though the band was trying to highlight their musicianship, harmonies and diversity. Personally, I’d prefer a few more like “Baby Don’t Dance!”

Check out the album linked below from iTunes, where you can get the entire thing, plus a few bonus tracks for an excellent price of $7.99.